History

Mymensingh (Bengali: ময়মনসিংহ, pronounced moy-
mon-shing-haw) is a city of Bangladesh situated on the river Brahmaputra. It is the headquarters of the administrative unit Mymensingh District. Mymensingh is the anglicized pronunciation of the original name Momenshahi, referring to a ruler called Momen Shah.The city is known for educational institutions like Bangladesh
Agricultural University, Mymensingh Medical College, Mymensingh Engineering College, Mymensingh Ananda Mohan College, Mymensingh Muminunnesa Women College, Mymensingh Poly technique Institute and Mymensingh Girls’ Cadet
College. Other landmark institutions include Mymensingh Army Cantonment. Also it is related with old Brahmaputra river, handcrafted duvet called Nakshikantha and a rural ballad called Moimonsingho Geetika.
Mymensingh city is located about 120 km (75 mi) north of Dhaka which is the
capital of the country.

Mymensingh is one of the 16 old districts of Bangladesh which was constituted by the British East India Company on 1 May 1787.[5] Being more than 220 years old, Mymensingh has a rich cultural and political history. At the beginning Begunbari was chosen as the headquarters of the district. However the district headquarters was relocated to Mymensingh when Begunbari devastated by flash flood. Earlier Mymensingh was called Nasirabad.[6] During the British Raj most of the inhabitants of the town were Hindus.
From the early 20th century Muslims moved into town. Since then this city has played an important role as a center for secularism. The Vidyamoyee Uccha Balika Bidyalaya and Muminunnesa Women’s College have played a great role in educating Bengali Muslim women. A majority of first-generation successful Bangladeshi women have attended these schools and colleges, including the first woman justice of the High Court of Bangladesh, Justice Nazmun Ara Sultana.[7] However, many Hindu families left Bangladesh during the partition of India in 1947. A second spell of exodus took place following the Indo-Pak war of 1965. Many people born and raised Mymensingh have left for West Bengal since the 1960s. The exodus continues albeit at a slower pace.
The nine-month liberation war of Bangladesh started on 27 March 1971. Mymensingh remained free from the occupation army until 23 April 1971. Pakistani occupation forces deserted Mymensingh on 10 December, and Mukti Bahini took over on 11 December, just five days ahead of the victory of Dhaka on 16 December.

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